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NEWSWISE FAST PITCH

Weekly events giving members the opportunity to meet with journalists online and pitch their story ideas.

“I haven’t enjoyed getting a pitch this much in, well…ever!” — Ben Gruber, Reuters

EVENT REGISTRATION

Keeping Carbon in the Sea, Keeping Plastics Out, and Keeping Sea Level Down

This Environmental Science and Earth Day Expert Panel will feature scientists from NYU, University of Portsmouth, and Hamilton College

Tuesday, Apr 27, 2021, 2:00pm - 3:00pm EDT

EVENT DESCRIPTION

This Environmental Science and Earth Day Expert Panel will feature scientists from NYU, University of Portsmouth, and Hamilton College to discuss recent work on sea level rise, the science of “blue carbon” stored in the sea, and important policy changes to reduce plastic pollution in the ocean.
Panelists:

  • Aaron Strong, Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies at Hamilton College. Trained as an interdisciplinary sustainability scientist, Strong’s research focuses on understanding the impacts of climate change and the dynamics of climate feedbacks in both terrestrial and marine systems, including work on ocean acidification, carbon sequestration, and sea-level rise.

  • Steve Fletcher, Professor of Ocean Policy and Economy and Director of the Sustainability and the Environment Research Theme at the University of Portsmouth.
    Professor Fletcher is the United Nations Ocean Lead and he heads the University of Portsmouth's Revolution Plastics initiative. Professor Fletcher is involved in research which is looking at G20 plastic policies and combating the urgent challenge of plastic pollution in the world's oceans. He can talk about solutions to this global issue which include how isolated interventions have minimal impact and that systemic change is the key to success by bringing together countries, governments, business and communities to work together.

  • Maurizio Porfiri, Institute Professor at New York University Tandon School of Engineering. Professor Porfiri was lead researcher in a study on how the cascading effects of the migration in Bangladesh will ultimately affect 1.3 million people across the country by 2050. The work has implications for coastal populations worldwide.

  • Registration is closed for this event.

    For more information or questions, please email:

    [email protected]